Building record MYO1189 - 114 Micklegate

Summary

A late 17th century house; a third storey was added and shopfront fitted in the late 19th century; further 19th and 20th century alterations.

Location

Grid reference SE 5979 5155 (point)
Map sheet SE55SE
Unitary Authority City of York, North Yorkshire

Map

Type and Period (3)

Full Description

House. Late C17; third storey added and shopfront fitted in late C19; further C19 and C20 alterations.

MATERIALS: lower storeys of orange brick in Flemish bond, third storey of darker orange brick; rear wing of reddish brick in stretcher bond, with brick coping and kneelers to gable end; left return of mottled brick; right return rendered. Timber eaves band and bracketed cornice between moulded consoles capped with gablets; slate roof with brick stacks.

EXTERIOR: 3-storey 4-window front. Shopfront of plain pilasters beneath frieze and moulded cornice interrupted by moulded consoles capped with gablets; glazed shop door and overlight to right of 4-light shop window over panelled riser. Windows on first and second floors are 8-pane sashes with painted stone sills and flat arches, those on second floor cambered. Broad raised band at second floor level. Rear: gabled wing of 2 storeys and attic, partly obscured by later building. Attic window is 2x9-pane horizontal sliding sash beneath segmental brick arch. Right return: part of painted sign advertising Whitby Olivers' furnishing store survives.

INTERIOR: not inspected: RCHM records close string staircase with turned balusters and flat handrail ramped-up to square newels. Between the lower floors, the staircase is lit by a 2-light window with original mullion and high transom. On the first floor, the larger front room is lined with fielded panelling with dado rail, and cornice. Fireplace has early C19 marble surround. A room at the back retains an C18 moulded fireplace surround. HISTORICAL NOTE: the house was the birthplace in 1803 of Joseph Aloysius Hansom, architect and inventor of the hansom cab and remained in the possession of his family until c1880. (City of York: RCHME: South-west of the Ouse: HMSO: 1972-: 92-93).
Listing NGR: SE5979351558

Derived from English Heritage LB download dated: 22/08/2005

House, No. 114, was built in the second half of the 17th century, with two storeys and cellars. A third storey was added in the mid 19th century and during the same century many alterations were made throughout. The freehold of the property belonged in the 18th century to Ann Thorp, who married John Heron of Sculcoates, and to their descendants, but the house was leased to Edward Bedingfield, esq. (1730–1802), a son of Sir Henry Bedingfield, 3rd baronet. Edward settled at York about the time of his marriage in 1754 to Mary, daughter of Sir John Swinburne of Capheaton. Of the ten children born to Edward and Mary between 1754 and 1771, while this was their home, only one had issue, Anne, born here on 21 March 1758: she married Thomas Waterton of Walton Hall near Wakefield and became the mother of Charles Waterton the celebrated naturalist. Edward died here in 1802 (York Courant, 17 May), and his widow moved to No. 109 The Mount, letting this house to Richard Hansom (1746–1818), carpenter, who soon afterwards bought the freehold for £450 (YCA, E.96, f. 6v.). Hansom's grandson Joseph Aloysius Hansom (1803–82), architect and inventor of the hansom cab, is stated to have been born here on 26 October 1803, and the property continued in the family until late in the 19th century (Borthwick Inst., Rate Books of Holy Trinity, Micklegate; Directories). It included a garden extending back to Toft Green, where the former stable was converted by the Hansoms into a joinery workshop. By 1881 the premises were occupied by a provision merchant.

The street front is of red brick above a modern shop front; the larger bricks of the top storey show its later date. The back has a 19th-century gable above 17th-century brickwork of the lower storeys.

The ground floor has been converted to a shop. The Staircase (Plate 84) rises against the E. Wall, and has turned oak balusters like those of the altar rails at Holy Trinity, Goodramgate, dated 1675. Between the lower floors, the staircase is lit by a two-light window with original oak mullion and high transom. On the first floor, the larger of the two front rooms is lined with fielded panelling (Fig. 16f) with dado rail and cornice; it has an early 19th-century marble surround to the fireplace. A room at the back retains an 18th-century moulded fireplace surround.

Derived from RCHME - 'Secular Buildings: Micklegate', in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in City of York, Volume 3, South west (London, 1972), pp. 68-96. Monument 94.

Information from the NMR
114 Micklegate. A late 17th century house; a third storey was added and shopfront fitted in the late 19th century; further 19th and 20th century alterations. Exterior: 3-storey 4-window front.

613515 Architectural Survey Investigation by RCHME/EH Architectural Survey

BF060842 114 MICKLEGATE, YORK File of material relating to a site or building. This material has not yet been fully catalogued.


NMR, NMR data (Unpublished document). SYO2214.

RCHME, 1972, RCHME City of York Volume III South-west of the Ouse (Monograph). SYO64.

Sources/Archives (2)

  • --- Unpublished document: NMR. NMR data.
  • --- Monograph: RCHME. 1972. RCHME City of York Volume III South-west of the Ouse.

Protected Status/Designation

Related Monuments/Buildings (0)

Related Events/Activities (1)

Record last edited

Feb 11 2020 2:34PM

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