Monument record MYO3535 - Roman Settlement Kexby

Summary

A Roman road-side settlement consisting of rectilinear ditched enclosures is visible as cropmarks on air photographs. The conjoined enclosures flank a Roman road (recorded in SE 75 SW 42) and are on average 70 metres by 20 metres, but some are sub-divided. The road-side settlement borders almost the entire length of the road which lies west and east of the River Derwent. Ian Lawton (SYO1068) wrote: " It is now possible to shed a little light on the nature of the total site with the evidence available to date. Environmental evidence from the west-bank has provided data which shows that the late Iron Age landscape on the site seems to have consisted of prime woodland, which was cleared and burnt prior to the construction of the settlement. This evidence is paralleled with data recovered from Shiptonthorpe, where a similar scenario took place prior to the establishment of the settlement there in the early 2nd century. The Samian recovered from the west-bank settlement has been analysed by Brian Hartley and his report suggests that there is a level of Neronian-early Flavian and Flavian material within the overall assemblage which indicates the possibility that the site started life in the 70's AD, with an early military presence underlying the later civilian settlement. Analysis of the pottery recovered from the east bank would suggest that occupation there only started in the early 2nd century and continued to the 4th century. There is also evidence to suggest the possibility that Flavian metalworking was taking place within the west-bank settlement, close to the river. Overall, the later settlement seems to have continued to flourish when the military presence moved on, enlarging and developing on the west bank to the north and south of the arterial road, with an extended development appearing on the east bank. To date, the road evidence suggests that the River Derwent was crossed by a bridge, with the road system extending back into Eboracum to the south-west, and, crossing the river, climbing the Low Catton ridge to form two routes, one cutting through the present Stamford Bridge village, heading for the crossing by the ford, and onwards towards Malton, the other travelling through the settlement, along the south of the present village and onwards towards Garrowby Hill. The settlement would seem in the main to consist of timber buildings, set either on low timber or stone foundation walls. Parallels to this latter type of building technique can be seen at Hibaldstow, although a contrast is seen in the building techniques noted at Shiptonthorpe. The evidence of stone construction on the site located to date shows nothing of architectural embellishment or of interior decoration, and little in the way of roofing material. The aerial photographs of the whole settlement show scant evidence of masonry walls, and the cross-site trenches seems to confirm this observation. More work is obviously needed to confirm the range of constructional techniques utilised over the whole settlement. The site has the potential to produce further environmental material, and especially where the well is concerned, total waterlogged deposits. Other low-lying parts of the site close to the river may aLso reward attention. The areas around the well and building show deposits reflecting contemporary ground surfaces, and indicate the possibility that late Roman deposits may survive intact. First evidence has now been located for the existence of pottery production in the mid 2nd century, either within the settlement as a 'cottage' industry, or azound its immediate vicinity, the scale of which has yet to be ascertained. The settlements location within the arterial road and river network, and its ranking within the agricultural or industrial economy of the azea aze important factors in the growth and development of the site, one facet of which is perhaps reflected in the enlargement of the main road through the settlement."

Location

Grid reference Centred SE 7015 5446 (548m by 401m)
Map sheet SE75SW
Civil Parish Kexby, City of York, North Yorkshire
Unitary Authority City of York, North Yorkshire

Map

Type and Period (2)

Full Description

NMR Imformation:

A Roman road-side settlement consisting of rectilinear ditched enclosures is visible as cropmarks on air photographs. The conjoined enclosures flank a Roman road (recorded in SE 75 SW 42) and are on average 70 metres by 20 metres, but some are sub-divided. The road-side settlement, centred at SE 7095 5466 and SE 7015 5450, borders almost the entire length of the road which lies west and east of the River Derwent. (1-3)

Air photographs taken in 2006 show a possible easterly extension to the road (SE 75 SW 42) and its associated settlement described above. The ditches, visible as cropmarks, are centred at SE 7162 5467. (4-5)

1 Oblique aerial photograph reference number NMR SE 7054/23 (12703/34) 20-JUL-1995
2 Oblique aerial photograph reference number NMR SE 7054/16 (12542/25) 22-JUL-1994
3 Oblique aerial photograph reference number NMR SE 7054/8 (12177/21) 15-AUG-1994
4 Oblique aerial photograph reference number NMR SE 7154/18 (20574/42) 21-JUL-2006
5 Oblique aerial photograph reference number NMR SE 7154/21 (20574/45) 21-JUL-2006

Related event: English Heritage annual aerial reconnaissance. 2006-2007.


Ian G Lawton, 1999, Derventio: A Roman settlement at North farm and Reckondales, Stamford bridge (Article in Journal). SYO1068.

Sources/Archives (1)

  • --- Article in Journal: Ian G Lawton. 1999. Derventio: A Roman settlement at North farm and Reckondales, Stamford bridge.

Protected Status/Designation

Related Monuments/Buildings (1)

Related Events/Activities (7)

Record last edited

Dec 11 2020 2:24PM

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